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Martin à Bagnol, early 19th C. French Capucine
Martin à Bagnol, early 19th C. French Capucine - Clocks Style Empire Martin à Bagnol, early 19th C. French Capucine - Martin à Bagnol, early 19th C. French Capucine - Empire
Ref : 08-017
7 500 €
Period :
19th century
Artist :
Martin à Bagnol
Provenance :
France
Medium :
Brass, steel, enamel
Dimensions :
l. 4.33 inch X H. 11.81 inch X P. 3.94 inch
Clocks  - Martin à Bagnol, early 19th C. French Capucine 19th century - Martin à Bagnol, early 19th C. French Capucine Empire - Martin à Bagnol, early 19th C. French Capucine
Jacques Nève

Antique Clocks


+32 477 27 19 08
Martin à Bagnol, early 19th C. French Capucine

Enamel dial with Roman numerals, red Arabic numerals for the quarter markers, and red signature Martin à Bagnol (North of Limoges in the Massif Central).
Double rack strike on the hour and two minutes past the hour, single half-hourly strike on a silvered bell. Alarm set by a third hand on the dial.
Finely cut blued steel hands with brass tips, steel alarm hand. Eight-day movement with simplified Maltese cross winding stops on both barrels,
anchor recoil escapement with silk suspension.
Alarm system set by the steel hand on the dial, and wound by pulling the string on the left side.

Height (with carrying handle upright): 30cm (11.8 in).


The Capucine clock is the early version of what is commonly known as a Carriage Clock. It was produced from the mid-18th C to the mid-19th C. It had a rectangular shape, small turned finials on the top corners, and fitted with a silvered bell topped with a carrying handle.

Its movement construction was quite unique, half-way between the typical French “Paris” movement of the time, and the Comtoise clock (for some of its features on the strike side: no warning, double strike on the hour, and pull-wind repeat.) The one feature they all have is an alarum. It often has a vertical swinging pendulum that you can either attach to the rear plate or easily remove for transport. These movements generally run for eight days.

The generic term of “Capucine” is derived from “capuche”, which means “hood”. Indeed with its bell on top one may think also of the Capucin brethren, where from it may also have derived its name. History has it that the Emperor Napoleon was providing his high-ranking officers with such a clock to make sure that they would always turn up on time.

Delevery information :

All clocks are carefully selected and restored to the highest standards, and are supplied with a full guarantee of authenticity and working order, delivered and installed personally wherever possible.
Shipping and dellivery conditions on request.

Jacques Nève

CATALOGUE

French Mantel Clocks Empire