EUR

FR   EN   中文

CONNECTION
Solid mahogany scriban - Bordeaux 18th century
Solid mahogany scriban - Bordeaux 18th century - Furniture Style Louis XV Solid mahogany scriban - Bordeaux 18th century - Solid mahogany scriban - Bordeaux 18th century - Louis XV Antiquités - Solid mahogany scriban - Bordeaux 18th century
Ref : 96929
17 000 €
Period :
18th century
Provenance :
France, Bordeaux
Medium :
Solid mahogany
Dimensions :
l. 50.39 inch X H. 44.49 inch X P. 25.2 inch
Furniture  - Solid mahogany scriban - Bordeaux 18th century 18th century - Solid mahogany scriban - Bordeaux 18th century Louis XV - Solid mahogany scriban - Bordeaux 18th century Antiquités - Solid mahogany scriban - Bordeaux 18th century
Antiquités Philippe Glédel

18th Furniture, country french furniture


+33 (0)2 99 94 08 44
+33 (0)6 11 17 90 32
Solid mahogany scriban - Bordeaux 18th century

Chest of drawers called "scriban" in solid mahogany
curved all sides opening to a flap and four drawers.
Bordeaux work from the end of the Louis XV period.

Unlike the cabaret table, the fashion for scriban chests of drawers was not born from the Parisian influence but rather from the relations that the major French ports had with the Northern countries. Indeed, its origin is to be seen in the Dutch cabinet or "schrifcabinet" whose lower body is strongly curved. This is even more true in Bordeaux, a city that had commercial relations with Holland.
Thus, in the 18th century, this piece of furniture that we now call a "scriban" was referred to as a "bureau-cabinet". This is probably not a simple coincidence because it seems to have the same functions as the old ebony cabinets of the Louis XIV period, both a piece of furniture designed to contain precious and secret objects but with a strong spirit of representation. In Bordeaux, even more than the famous commode en tombeau, the commode scribanne is the furniture of the wealthy shipowner or merchant of Bordeaux, perfect expression of the pomp of these merchant societies of the 18th century.

We have acquired a certain number of Bordeaux scribans in our career, often very rich, but we will remember this one for its quality, and we will indeed be able to review every detail without finding a single weakness, whether in the choice of wood, their sections (for example, that of the front of a drawer of the chest is 45 mm) their assemblies ... From the very first glance, this rich piece of furniture imposes itself, and convinces us that we are in the presence of a piece of furniture answering the order of a silver and demanding customer.
The woods used are all superb: mahogany for the front, the theater and the sides of the scriban, flamed mahogany for the top, speckled mahogany for the frame supporting the flap, mahogany wire for the sides, and even the darkening of the drawers which are surprisingly pleasing to the eye: Royal walnut of Périgord for the sides of the interior drawers and the bottoms of the drawers of the chest, Riga oak mesh for the bottoms of the interior drawers and the sides of the drawers of the chest.
Moreover the lines of the furniture are remarkable, with a great amplitude and a perfect fluidity of the curves, the assemblies are for their part close to perfection.
The mahogany with its cherry-red patina is illuminated by a rich original bronze ornament (whose thickness is a guarantee of solidity for this heavy piece of furniture) ordered from the capital. As far as port furniture is concerned, bronze trimmings often came from Paris (for high quality furniture only). Our cabinetmaker is particularly innovative, choosing the latest fashionable bronzes from the capital in the 1760's (which correspond perfectly to the date of manufacture of this piece of furniture), of a model called Transition.

The upper part opens with a flap mounted on a frame, molded around its edge and curved in the upper part (equipped with a brass lock with double bolt and held open by two brass hinges and two iron compasses) which reveals a large theater shaped like a ship's hull: in the center a monoxyl tabernacle door molded, arched and strongly curved in plan is shouldered by two high drawers concealed in the woodwork (these drawers were to contain important and confidential mail / Note that they must be pushed with a fingernail from the side and that they are firmly blocked by pegs through the interior of the tabernacle where a wooden bolt also comes to block the sliding of the floor closing the secret cellar / Thus, Let's not be mistaken, the tabernacle closing with two turns of its small key acts as a real safe). On either side are six drawers arranged in three rows, and in pairs without crossbars (of which one can observe -in particular on the photograph of the drawer placed flat- the formidable purity of the curves in plan and in elevation combined), the whole surmounted by a step.
We also note an excellent connection between the desk and the chest of drawers, a connection that is not as convincing on all the scribans, providing here an excellent homogeneity to the whole.
We also note an excellent connection between the desk and the chest of drawers, a connection that is not as convincing on all the scribans, providing here an excellent homogeneity to the whole.
The chest of drawers is provided with significant curves, both in plan and in elevation. The uprights are decorated with reserves and molded on their inner edge in the continuity of the crosspieces to form a frame around the drawers, while the edges of the drawers are themselves underlined by a wide band. Note the cut-outs in the drawers, particularly those of the two smallest in the upper row framing the front of the secret cellar, which is dressed with a small drawer in a richly molded trompe l'oeil in the form of a shield. Finally, the front and rear jambs are punctuated with well carved scrolled feet and the wide lower crosspiece, underlined by a large frame molding that continues on the side crosspieces, is covered with a vigorous scrollwork.

Very rare original condition (not a single graft to report), with all its period bronze and wrought iron fittings (handles, lock escutcheons, compasses, the five locks with 3 keys to operate them. To note simply a replaced hinge).
The piece of furniture has been restored* and given a superb patina in filled wax.
Speaking of restoration, let's also point out two quite clear and deep marks on the back of the rear jambs. Our carpenter was astonished by this until he had to re-case the upper part (the occasion is too good not to point out, which often the customers are not really aware of, that the restoration of a piece of furniture of more than two centuries is a serious matter, too often purely abandoned nowadays, and so when our carpenter restores a piece of furniture he takes care of the inner part as well as the outer part. Our scribans are thus almost all dismantled and then reassembled). And so, taking his long and heavy clamps and wondering how he was going to place them at about 45 degrees without them slipping, he immediately understood the reason for these two famous (and very judicious) notches. He confided to us that it was for him a beautiful wink of the past.

This piece of furniture, opulent but with a classical order and an exceptional finish, takes on the appearance of a commissioned piece for a shipowner from Bordeaux.


Bordeaux, late Louis XV period, 18th century

Antiquités Philippe Glédel

CATALOGUE

Desk & Secretaire Louis XV