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A pair of candelabra with sleeping feasants, by Antoine-Louis Barye.
A pair of candelabra with sleeping feasants, by Antoine-Louis Barye. - Sculpture Style Napoléon III A pair of candelabra with sleeping feasants, by Antoine-Louis Barye. - A pair of candelabra with sleeping feasants, by Antoine-Louis Barye. - Napoléon III Antiquités - A pair of candelabra with sleeping feasants, by Antoine-Louis Barye.
Ref : 87864
4 900 €
Period :
19th century
Artist :
Antoine-Louis BARYE (1796-1875)
Provenance :
France, Paris
Medium :
Bronze with brown patina.
Dimensions :
H. 6.89 inch
Sculpture  - A pair of candelabra with sleeping feasants, by Antoine-Louis Barye. 19th century - A pair of candelabra with sleeping feasants, by Antoine-Louis Barye. Napoléon III - A pair of candelabra with sleeping feasants, by Antoine-Louis Barye. Antiquités - A pair of candelabra with sleeping feasants, by Antoine-Louis Barye.
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A pair of candelabra with sleeping feasants, by Antoine-Louis Barye.

A pair of candelabra with sleeping feasants, by Antoine-Louis Barye, bronze with brown patina.

Height: 7.1/2 inch.

Antoine-Louis BARYE (1796-1875) Pair of end table candlesticks with sleeping pheasants asleep on a Bronze vine with brown patina. Signed on the terrace, in the motif, vertically on the pheasant's tail BARYE Height 19cm. Bibliography: Michel Poletti and Alain Richarme, Barye, catalog raisonné of sculptures, Gallimard, Paris, 2000, model listed under number D18 p.?385. Famous for his animal sculptures, Antoine-Louis Barye (1795-1875) was the son of a goldsmith, who trained in metalwork with a military equipment manufacturer and with Jacques-Henri Fauconnier. In 1818, he entered the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris and apprenticed in the studio of the sculptor François Joseph Bosio and the painter Jean-Antoine Gros. After several failures at the Grand Prix de Rome, Barye slammed the door of the Fine Arts in 1825. He then turned to animal sculpture which he would bring back to date. With his friend Delacroix, he goes regularly to the menagerie of the Natural History Museum? To study and observe animals. It was in 1831 that Barye made himself known to the general public by exhibiting at the Salon the Tiger devouring a gavial (Louvre), a work staging a violent fight "of impressive virtuosity". Two years later, he triumphed with the Lion with the serpent in plaster, which will also be exhibited with success in its bronze version at the Salon of 1836. Preferring bronze to marble considered too cold, the artist multiplies the statuettes and the small ones. animal groups that he melts and chisels himself. After a difficult period, the Second Empire gave it a second wind. Barye carves animals like never before. First of all, they are the subject of the sculpture, and not a simple accessory. Then, the artist relies on a precise and faithful analysis of nature. General terms of delivery: General terms of sale and delivery: The price indicated on the advertisement includes delivery throughout mainland France. For Germany, Belgium, Italy or Spain contact us for a quote. For the United States, non-EU Europe or the rest of the world contact us for a quote but the import taxes applicable in each country remain your responsibility. The packaging and the follow-up of the transport are ensured by us or by professional carriers specialized in Works of art.

Delevery information :

General conditions of sale and delivery: The price indicated on the ad includes the delivery throughout the metropolitan France. For Germany, Belgium, Italy or Spain contact us for a quote. For the United States, Europe outside the EU or the rest of the world contact us for a quote but the import taxes applicable in each country remain at your expense. The packing and the follow-up of the transport are insured by ourselves or by professional carriers specialized in works of art.

Antiquités Sérignan

CATALOGUE

Bronze Sculpture Napoléon III