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Portrait of a young man attributed to  Gaspard Rigaud (1661; 1705)
Portrait of a young man attributed to  Gaspard Rigaud (1661; 1705) - Paintings & Drawings Style Louis XIV Portrait of a young man attributed to  Gaspard Rigaud (1661; 1705) - Portrait of a young man attributed to  Gaspard Rigaud (1661; 1705) - Louis XIV Antiquités - Portrait of a young man attributed to  Gaspard Rigaud (1661; 1705)
Ref : 98732
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Period :
17th century
Provenance :
France
Medium :
Oil on canvas
Dimensions :
L. 36.61 inch X l. 30.71 inch
Paintings & Drawings  - Portrait of a young man attributed to  Gaspard Rigaud (1661; 1705) 17th century - Portrait of a young man attributed to  Gaspard Rigaud (1661; 1705) Louis XIV - Portrait of a young man attributed to  Gaspard Rigaud (1661; 1705) Antiquités - Portrait of a young man attributed to  Gaspard Rigaud (1661; 1705)
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Portrait of a young man attributed to Gaspard Rigaud (1661; 1705)

Original canvas on its certainly original frame also 74 cm by 59 cm
Very beautiful period frame 93 cm by 78 cm

The artist offers us the very successful portrait of a young man twenty years or less. He is richly dressed in a blue velvet jacket beautifully embroidered with gold thread and a spectacular fine lace tie tied twice.

Gaspard Rigaud (1661; 1705)

Gaspard Rigaud is the younger brother of Hyacinthe Rigaud. His beginnings are still poorly known and we find him for the first time in Paris on January 27, 1692, when he married Marguerite Caillot Three children were born from this union: the first, Hyacinthe (1693-1738), had his homonymous uncle as godfather. . He dies without issue. A second daughter was born in 1695 but died shortly before 1707. The last, Marguerite Élisabeth (1697-1743), married her second godfather, the painter Jean Ranc, on July 17, 1715.

In 1695, Gaspard officially entered his brother's workshop to help him with his overwork. Indeed, Hyacinthe met with considerable success following the production of a portrait of Louis XIV known today as the 1695 version repeated hundreds of times by the workshop until 1726. Gaspard began by making eleven copies, nine draperies and a head, and sometimes receives sixty pounds for a simple copy. In 1698, he earned nearly 425 pounds for his whole year, twice as much as the painter Jean le Gros. But the young Rigaud aims for emancipation and works for the Parisian bourgeoisie. His portraits, less expensive than those of his brother, are courted.
Gaspard paints with the same archetypes as Hyacinthe. He then went to the Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture where he was received on July 30, 1701. He was then asked for the portraits of the painters Raon and Charles Coypel. He does not have the opportunity to realize them because he dies suddenly at his home. Hyacinthe Rigaud will specify, from his first will, to want to be buried next to his brother whom he loved very much. His inventory after death reveals that he left nearly 250 sketches and 28 unfinished portraits, attesting to his full creative activity. Few attested portraits of Gaspard are known. They are mostly in private collections and in museums, notably the Hyacinthe Rigaud museum in Perpignan.

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CATALOGUE

17th Century Oil Painting Louis XIV