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Janiform marble head - Roman Empire 1st / 3rd century after J.C
Janiform marble head - Roman Empire 1st / 3rd century after J.C - Ancient Art Style Janiform marble head - Roman Empire 1st / 3rd century after J.C - Janiform marble head - Roman Empire 1st / 3rd century after J.C - Antiquités - Janiform marble head - Roman Empire 1st / 3rd century after J.C
Ref : 94830
SOLD
Period :
BC to 10th century
Provenance :
Roman Empire
Medium :
White marble
Dimensions :
l. 6.5 inch X H. 11.61 inch X P. 6.5 inch
Ancient Art  - Janiform marble head - Roman Empire 1st / 3rd century after J.C BC to 10th century - Janiform marble head - Roman Empire 1st / 3rd century after J.C  - Janiform marble head - Roman Empire 1st / 3rd century after J.C Antiquités - Janiform marble head - Roman Empire 1st / 3rd century after J.C
Galerie Alexandre Piatti

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Janiform marble head - Roman Empire 1st / 3rd century after J.C

This marble head, known as janiform (with two faces looking in opposite directions), represents on one side the face of a chubby child, with curly hair girded with a mitra (a strip often made of leather, holding the hair) and smiling. The other side represents a visibly feminine head: the face is round, the eyes are almond-shaped and the wavy hair is separated by a median stripe. The hairstyles of the two figures are intertwined with ivy leaves. It is probably a representation of the god Bacchus as a child and a Bacchante. The Bacchae are worshippers, priestesses of Bacchus and the main members of his procession. In the Greeks, they are called maenads and are the followers of Dionysus. According to Greek mythology, the first maenads were the nannies of the god: the nymphs of Mount Nysa, to whom the child was entrusted by Hermes. It is therefore common in ancient art to represent Dionysus as a child accompanied by one of these women.
It is possible that this head was part of a larger architectural ensemble: on the top of the skull, there is a slit reminiscent of the one on the top of some pillars. Perhaps this head was used as a capital for the top of a column or as a decorative element.
Provenance: former collection of the director of the Munich Archaeological Museum until 1945; then collection of Bernhard Pfeiffer in Diespeck; finally public auction on December 27, 2015.

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Galerie Alexandre Piatti

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Ancient Art