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Boulle marquetry bookcase by Nicolas Sageot circa 1700
Boulle marquetry bookcase by Nicolas Sageot circa 1700 - Furniture Style Louis XIV Boulle marquetry bookcase by Nicolas Sageot circa 1700 - Boulle marquetry bookcase by Nicolas Sageot circa 1700 - Louis XIV Antiquités - Boulle marquetry bookcase by Nicolas Sageot circa 1700
Ref : 93274
58 000 €
Period :
17th century
Provenance :
France, Paris
Medium :
Tortoise shell, ebony, ormolu
Dimensions :
l. 47.24 inch X H. 88.19 inch X P. 16.93 inch
Furniture  - Boulle marquetry bookcase by Nicolas Sageot circa 1700 17th century - Boulle marquetry bookcase by Nicolas Sageot circa 1700 Louis XIV - Boulle marquetry bookcase by Nicolas Sageot circa 1700 Antiquités - Boulle marquetry bookcase by Nicolas Sageot circa 1700
Franck Baptiste Provence

French Regional and Parisian furniture


+33 (0)6 45 88 53 58
Boulle marquetry bookcase by Nicolas Sageot circa 1700

Rare bookcase in "boulle" marquetry of cut brass fillets on a red tortoiseshell background framed in ebony.
It opens with two full leaves in the lower part, two drawers in the central belt and two glazed leaves in the upper part.
The entire front has an abundant decoration inspired by the engravings of the ornamentalist Jean Bérain (1640-1711).

The lower leaves are centered with the effigy of the goddess neck brace.
Sheltered by lambrequins, she sits on a mound with her bow and a chimera that she holds in her hand.
Around it, an abundance of fauna, made up of butterflies, mosquitoes, squirrels and chimeras, twirl in a tangle of arabesques adorned with Indian masks and Medici vases garnished with flowers.

Above, the two drawers are decorated with the same arabesques in which two actors of the commedia del Arte evolve.

The top leaves are glazed; the glasses framed by an arched "chapel" border at the top, adorned with the same decoration teeming with arabesques and birds.

The cornice is finely decorated with a frieze of palm leaves in the first part and against part in tortoiseshell and brass.

The ebony and blackened pear wood sides feature two rectangular panels highlighted with bronze rods.

The whole rests on five spinning feet.


Core and bottom in softwood, the reverse of the doors in walnut veneer, the interiors of the drawers in solid walnut.

Original locks, keys and cremones.

Very good state of conservation, small restorations in marquetry.

Work by Nicolas Sageot, Paris Louis XIV period around 1700.

Dimensions:

Height: 224 cm; Width: 120 cm; Depth: 43 cm


-A very close library published on page 156 of the book “André-Charles Boulle; cabinetmaker, carver and marketer of the king ”by Pierre Ramond published by Vial.

Nicolas Sageot (1666-1731) is an ebony carpenter received master in Paris in 1706. He was married to a daughter of his colleague Jacques Roussel. He probably worked as a free worker in the Faubourg Saint-Antoine.
Nicolas Sageot worked from the end of the 17th century, as a free worker, in the faubourg Saint-Antoine. Ebony carpenter in Paris under the Regency, Sageot was married to a daughter of his colleague Jacques Roussel. His workshop, probably kept by his widow, seems to have survived until the end of the reign of Louis XV.
Few of Sageot's works are stamped but they can be attributed to him by comparison with those which are. This is furniture inspired by the works of Boulle, mainly large libraries.

Our opinion :

An in-depth study of the decor allows us to attribute with certainty the library that we present to the great cabinetmaker of the reign of Louis XIV, Nicolas Sageot.
The master's body of work is well known because Sageot will affix his mark towards the end of his career, only on Regency style furniture, including two-leaf bookcases.
Some details like mosquitoes, butterflies or squirrels are exactly the same as those that can be found on stamped pieces.
The model we present, with two bodies separated by a belt of drawers, is still typically Louis XIV, and was produced, as for the Mazarin offices, slightly before this new law on the stamp.
If today the Boulle technique entered the pantheon of French cabinetmaking, it was widely criticized at the time.
These pieces in shimmering colors and a thousand splinters of brass, followed directly on from the austere natural wood furniture of the reign of Louis XIII, and aroused a great deal of misunderstanding.
It is amusing to note that King Louis XIV was a pioneer, a great lover of ancient and contemporary art.
The library we present, in perfect condition, is a very fine example of this fashion which in our eyes constitutes the quintessence of French cabinetmaking.

Franck Baptiste Provence

CATALOGUE

Bookcase & Vitrine Louis XIV