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French carved commode in walnut, bordeaux circa 1750
French carved commode in walnut, bordeaux circa 1750 - Furniture Style Louis XV French carved commode in walnut, bordeaux circa 1750 - French carved commode in walnut, bordeaux circa 1750 - Louis XV Antiquités - French carved commode in walnut, bordeaux circa 1750
Ref : 84969
9 500 €
Period :
18th century
Provenance :
France, Bordeaux
Medium :
Walnut
Dimensions :
l. 50.79 inch X H. 34.65 inch X P. 25 inch
Furniture  - French carved commode in walnut, bordeaux circa 1750 18th century - French carved commode in walnut, bordeaux circa 1750 Louis XV - French carved commode in walnut, bordeaux circa 1750 Antiquités - French carved commode in walnut, bordeaux circa 1750
Antiquités Franck Baptiste

French Regional and Parisian furniture


+33 (0)6 45 88 53 58
French carved commode in walnut, bordeaux circa 1750

Rare chest of drawers in walnut opening with two leaves on the front.
Model strongly curved on all sides, in plan as in elevation.
The two monoxyl leaves feature an alternation of several deep and ribbed moldings.
The uprights, hollowed out of three reserves including a circular one in the middle, rest on small snail feet.
The low cross molded and scalloped.
The sides have two panels, the top rectangular, the lower one "chapel".
The interior reveals a large shelf.

Original bottoms and shelves in solid chestnut.

Beautiful quality of mahogany stained walnut wood.

Good condition, small used restorations.

Bordeaux work from the beginning of the Louis XV period.

Dimensions:

Height: 88 cm; Width: 129 cm; Depth: 63.5 cm


Our opinion :

The chest of drawers that we present is of the greatest rarity.
The general shapes of our furniture are those of the traditional Bordeaux chest of drawers, the indentation at the level of the high cross member, the tightening of the uprights downwards, the small feet, the shape of the side panels, the reserves of the uprights, or the cutting the sleepers leaves no doubt that we are indeed in the presence of a piece of furniture from the Bordeaux region.
The mahogany hue of the walnut also confirms this hypothesis.
However, our chest of drawers has rare characteristics, such as the presence of two strongly curved leaves instead of drawers.
If chest of drawers with doors are indeed unusual, especially with curved doors, the technique used to obtain these panels is, to our knowledge, unique in this type of room.
Indeed our cabinetmaker chose to use monoxyl panels, that is to say cut from a single piece of wood, but above all he used end-grain wood, that is to say cut horizontally in the trunk, as a slice of sausage, while generally the trunks are cut out of wood wire, that is to say in long planks.
Its sole purpose is to give us a glimpse of the heart of the tree, with its growth rings, which are perfectly identical on both panels.
Remember that the panels of our dresser, whether those on the front or on the sides, were not bent in the water but cut in the mass with a gouge, on sections of wood over thirty centimeters of thick, in the densest part of the tree.
To this titanic work is added that of the complexity of the assembly, with panels, uprights and crossbeams sculpted separately and whose curves must fit together perfectly.
For all these reasons it seems highly probable that our dresser is the masterpiece of a companion.

Antiquités Franck Baptiste

CATALOGUE

Commode Louis XV