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Dolls head clock in Boulle marquetry by Lenoir, Paris, Louis XIV
Dolls head clock in Boulle marquetry by Lenoir, Paris, Louis XIV - Clocks Style Louis XIV Dolls head clock in Boulle marquetry by Lenoir, Paris, Louis XIV - Dolls head clock in Boulle marquetry by Lenoir, Paris, Louis XIV - Louis XIV Antiquités - Dolls head clock in Boulle marquetry by Lenoir, Paris, Louis XIV
Ref : 83300
Price on Request
Period :
18th century
Artist :
Lanoir Paris
Provenance :
France
Medium :
Ebony, pewter, brass, tortoiseshell, bronze
Dimensions :
l. 9.45 inch X H. 16.54 inch X P. 5.51 inch
Clocks  - Dolls head clock in Boulle marquetry by Lenoir, Paris, Louis XIV 18th century - Dolls head clock in Boulle marquetry by Lenoir, Paris, Louis XIV Louis XIV - Dolls head clock in Boulle marquetry by Lenoir, Paris, Louis XIV Antiquités - Dolls head clock in Boulle marquetry by Lenoir, Paris, Louis XIV
Antiquités Franck Baptiste

French Regional and Parisian furniture


+33 (0)6 45 88 53 58
Dolls head clock in Boulle marquetry by Lenoir, Paris, Louis XIV

Our pendulum in brass, pewter and ebony "Boulle" marquetry on a red scale background adopts a very original shape called a "doll's head", characteristic of watchmaking production at the end of the reign of Louis XIV.
This new model, which appeared at the very end of the 17th century, presents a subtle play on the swollen sides of curves and counter-curves resting on four claw feet.
This violin aspect continues on the rounded pediment decorated with a brass trellis. Four fire pots placed at the ends punctuate the upper decoration.
In our work, the artist plays with the colors, notably through the blackness of the ebony which contrasts with the red scale, copper and pewter.
This marquetry is adorned with a finely chiseled decoration composed of foliage scrolls and arabesques running through the eventful case of the clock as well as the ogee base.
A finely engraved medallion with a figure of a man wearing palm leaves interrupts the arabesques on the pediment.
The base of the plinth takes up the motif of lambrequins canopy.
The finely engraved pewter dial indicates the hours in Roman numerals and the days in Arabic numerals, it is signed Lenoir in Paris. *
The original date movement is signed on the "Lenoir Paris" mainplate, it was probably perfected during the reign of Louis XVI and its suspension subsequently modified.

Very good condition, perfect working order, revised by our watchmaker.

Core in fir, door and back in walnut.

French work from the end of the Louis XIV period.

Dimensions:

Height: 42 cm; Length: 24 cm; Depth: 14cm

* Lenoir in Paris: the name affixed on the dial and the mainplate of our pendulum can refer to one of the two sons of the famous watchmaker Simon Lenoir, Jean Baptiste born at the Chateau de Vincennes in 1653, received master in 1684 and died in Paris in 1716 , or Etienne born in 1660, received master in 1698 and died in Paris in 1739.
It is possible that the two brothers worked together in the same workshop because if we know almost nothing about the life of Jean Baptiste, we know that Etienne installed Place Dauphine was very famous in his time, his inventory after death in 1739 includes many many clocks and cartels, some in boulle marquetry.
His son Etienne Père (1698-1778) and his grandson Pierre Etienne (1724-1791) will perpetuate the family reputation and will be among the largest suppliers of watch movements throughout the 18th century in Paris.



BIBLIOGRAPHY:

P. Kjellberg, Encyclopedia of the French Pendulum from the Middle Ages to the 20th century, Les Editions de l'Amateur, p. 54, fig. B.


Similar models:

Two comparable clocks are illustrated in Tardy, “La Pendule Française des origines au Louis XV”, vol. 1, pp. 96-97.
One of them is now kept at the Museum of Fine Arts in Dijon.
Model signed Goulon in Marseille, May 23, 2014, Coutau Bégarie study (Result 11,000 euros hammer)
Model signed Martinot, sale Christies Amsterdam December 19, 2007 lot 473 (14,500 euros including fees)


Our opinion :

The composition of our pendulum can be compared to a drawing by the ornamentalist Daniel Marot (1663-1752) published on page 178 of the work by Ernst Warmuth "Das Ornamentenwerk des Daniel Marot", Berlin, 1892.
Until the end of the 17th century, massive and structured cases adopting straight forms dominated watch production under the reign of Louis XIV.
With this new smaller "doll's head" shape, the movement, the curve, the counter-curve and the volutes will gradually impose themselves until the Regency before being omnipresent under the reign of Louis XV.
This type of pendulum, original and innovative in its form, decorated with a rich ornamentation in precious materials, was very popular with amateurs.
Thus, an example is kept in the study of the apartments of Madame de Maintenon, secret wife of Louis XIV, at the Château de Fontainebleau.
Unfortunately very few of these clocks have come down to us, first of all because their production cost was very high and reserved for an elite of the nobility, but also because of the relative fragility of their marquetry and their very typical decoration. , which made them very quickly fall into disrepair.
Our rich pendulum in perfect condition bears the name of one of the most important watchmakers of the reign of Louis XIV; it is a rare example of this production which marks the very beginning of the great collaboration between cabinetmakers and watchmakers.

Antiquités Franck Baptiste

CATALOGUE

Mantel Clocks Louis XIV