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Pair of cabriolets with frame stamped Tillard, Paris around 1760
Pair of cabriolets with frame stamped Tillard, Paris around 1760 - Seating Style Louis XV Pair of cabriolets with frame stamped Tillard, Paris around 1760 - Pair of cabriolets with frame stamped Tillard, Paris around 1760 - Louis XV Antiquités - Pair of cabriolets with frame stamped Tillard, Paris around 1760
Ref : 83225
Price on Request   -   SALE PENDING
Period :
18th century
Artist :
Tillard
Medium :
Beech wood
Dimensions :
l. 25.59 inch X H. 34.25 inch X P. 24.8 inch
Seating  - Pair of cabriolets with frame stamped Tillard, Paris around 1760 18th century - Pair of cabriolets with frame stamped Tillard, Paris around 1760 Louis XV - Pair of cabriolets with frame stamped Tillard, Paris around 1760 Antiquités - Pair of cabriolets with frame stamped Tillard, Paris around 1760
Antiquités Franck Baptiste

French Regional and Parisian furniture


+33 (0)6 45 88 53 58
Pair of cabriolets with frame stamped Tillard, Paris around 1760

Rare pair of cabriolets armchairs in natural wood.
The slightly violin-shaped backrest with finely scalloped molded crossbars with florets at the top and drops on the uprights.
Circular seat, the central crosspiece deeply molded and adorned with flowers.
The side rails in acanthus staples connected to the armrests turned whip.
The feet finely wound in snails, surmounted by two molded cords supporting clusters of flowers.

Removable frame trim * (natural horsehair and straps), covered with blue silk velvet.

Very good state of conservation.

The two stamped "TILLARD" on the rear cross members, for Jean Baptiste Tillard. *

The sculpture, very nervous and of high quality attributable to Nicolas Heurtaut. *

Parisian work from the Louis XV period around 1760.

Dimensions:

Height: 87 cm; Width: 65 cm; Depth: 63 cm



Jean-Baptiste I Tilliard (1685-1766):

Coming from a large family of carpenters, Jean Baptiste I Tilliard received his master's degree in 1717. He then settled in the rue des menuisiers, the rue de Clery under the sign "with the arms of France", not far from his older brother Nicolas.
Considered, during the reign of Louis XV, as one of the most talented manufacturer of seats, he was appointed around 1730 (perhaps he took charge after his father) "ordinary carpenter of the crown furniture" and executed between 1737 and 1739, three of the most important pieces of furniture in the Palace of Versailles, including the Queen's apartment, the King's bedroom and the King's cabinet.
Its clients are part of the highest aristocracy. He worked, among others, for the Marquise de Pompadour as well as for the Prince of Soubise to whom he delivered a large number of works between 1751 and 1756.
For sculpture he worked with Daniel Quintel and François Roumier; when the latter died in 1748 he turned to Toussaint Foliot (1717-1798) and Nicolas Heurtaut (1720-1771).
He was assisted by his son Jean Baptiste II, born in 1723, who took over his father's workshop when the latter retired from business in 1764, at the age of seventy-eight.
He died in 1766.

Nicolas Heurtaut (1720-1771):

Carpenter and master sculptor considered one of the greatest siege masters, Nicolas Heurtaut entered the Académie de Saint-Luc in 1742 and began his career as a sculptor for some of the most important siege craftsmen in the capital. , notably Jean-Baptiste Tilliard and Jean Séné, known as Séné the father.
Received master in 1753, he set up his workshop in the rue de Bourbon and practiced indifferently as a carpenter and sculptor; this particularity allows it to manufacture all of its armchairs. It also produces framing rods, piers, frame borders, support furniture and consoles.


* The frame trim is very rare and reserved for the most beautiful seats.
Unlike other seats where the straps are nailed directly to the cross members, the chassis models feature removable frames that receive the straps, padding and fabric that is nailed to them.
These interchangeable frames can be tied with lacings (Lyonnaise region), or maintained by iron fixing pastes as on our model.
This practice reserved for the largest orders of the nobility had two purposes:

Preservation of barrels:
This ensured that the upholstery was not nailed directly to the chair, which prevented damage to it.
Recall that in the 18th century this type of armchair matched woodwork and was not seen simply as a utilitarian piece but as a very expensive part of the decor.

Finally, this type of trim allowed the chatelains to easily change fabrics according to the seasons, stitch tapestries or velvets for winter and autumn and silks or lighter cottons for summer.
The dropped frames were then stored tightly wrapped in burlap in the attics until the following season.
Such packages are still found today in the attics of castles.

Our opinion :

The high quality of our pair of seats is obvious from the first glance, starting with the opulence of the seat, with a circular shape, which is rare and announces the first beginnings of neoclassicism.
This moderation of forms is particularly successful, fluidity, purity and liveliness mingle on all parts of the seat and the eye cannot detect the slightest error or the slightest stiffness.
Then comes the time for details and analysis which allows us to understand the keys to such a success: to the perfection of the design is added wider and thicker crossbars, carved from selected walnut and beech wood, with very tight grains and perfect color, deeper moldings and finally a very nervous

Antiquités Franck Baptiste

CATALOGUE

Fauteuil & Bergere Louis XV