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Console with lambrequins in gilded wood, Louis XIV period
Console with lambrequins in gilded wood, Louis XIV period - Furniture Style Louis XIV Console with lambrequins in gilded wood, Louis XIV period - Console with lambrequins in gilded wood, Louis XIV period - Louis XIV Antiquités - Console with lambrequins in gilded wood, Louis XIV period
Ref : 83223
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Period :
18th century
Medium :
Gilded wood
Furniture  - Console with lambrequins in gilded wood, Louis XIV period 18th century - Console with lambrequins in gilded wood, Louis XIV period Louis XIV - Console with lambrequins in gilded wood, Louis XIV period Antiquités - Console with lambrequins in gilded wood, Louis XIV period
Antiquités Franck Baptiste

French Regional and Parisian furniture


+33 (0)6 45 88 53 58
Console with lambrequins in gilded wood, Louis XIV period

Rare console in linden wood gilded with leaf.
The front uprights of rectangular shape in winding acanthus "stick" with flowers of sunflowers perforated with foliage of acanthus.
Model with a solid back, adorned with a trellis studded with flowers and terminated on the sides by windings reminiscent of those of the uprights.
The top that supports the marble is finely molded with a frieze of gadroons with flowers or valances falling imitating trimmings. *
Ogee-shaped base with wide cut sides decorated with valances and an interlacing on the upper part.
Original crimson red marble from Caunes-Minervois. *

Original gilding with double patience amatie and brilliant.

Good state of conservation; reinforcements in the rear funds.

French work from the Louis XIV period around 1700.

Dimensions:

Height: 96 cm; Width: 89 cm; Depth: 47 cm


Our opinion :

The Louis XIV period consoles that have come down to us are extremely rare and finding an example with such a particular base and such fragile ornaments is even more so.
If the archives teach us that the king's buildings delivered gilded wood “console table legs” from the 17th century, this practice remained reserved for an elite and it was only during the second part of the 18th century that consoles made their entry into the interiors of the bourgeoisie.
The majority of this Louis Quatorzienne production quickly fell into disuse with the arrival of the rockery and many models were probably destroyed while the others did not survive the centuries, due to the fragility due to the complexity of their base.
However, the Louis XIV style marks the apogee of gilded wood in France, with productions of a finesse that will be unmatched thereafter.
While the work of the sculptor is often rightly praised, that of the gilder is just as important in this production and deserves to be highlighted because it is he who brings finesse to the sculpture.
Like the founder-chaser who will cold chisel the veins of a bronze sheet fresh out of the mold, the gilder will patiently release the ornaments impasted by the primer white then finely engrave them with the most subtle details.
Finally, it is he who will make the gilding shine with an Agatha stone, in order to bring a matte and shiny patina which will give even more relief to the sculpture.
This repair work, very abundant under Louis XIV, represents the quintessence of gilded wood, the trellis of our console is a very good example.




* Lambrequins are cut fabric festoons adorned with braid and often ended with trimmings tassels.
This decorative motif was very fashionable in France during the Louis XIV period, it was particularly used by the ornamentalists Daniel Marot (1661-1752) or Jean Bérain (1640-1711).
We can see domed bed skies, adorned with lambrequins which protect the figures balanced on terraces in their "arabesques".
André Charles Boulle, the famous cabinetmaker of the Sun King, is also a follower of the pattern that he affixes to the bases of his clocks, cartels but also on furniture, boxes, sheaths ...


* The crimson red marble is extracted from the quarries of Caunes-Minervois, a small village in the Aude, in the Languedoc-Roussillon region.
Already exploited in Roman times, it was used a lot in medieval buildings, churches and bourgeois houses in the region as well as in Spain, it was used to build capitals, columns, altarpieces, as well as many decorations.
A little abandoned, it was at the beginning of the seventeenth century that a Genoese sculptor resumed his exploitation, and again successfully marketed it, particularly in Italy, where it became a marble much appreciated by Baroque architects and decorators. Thus, for example, it can be found as a background red for certain panels in the baroque decoration of the pillars of the nave of Saint Peter's Basilica in Rome, those from which white marble doves stand out.
After the opening of the Canal du Midi, a path is built by the States of Languedoc, to reach the port of Puichéric, the transport of stones is therefore facilitated to reach Paris via the Garonne and the sea.
The careers were made royal careers in 1692 and were under the direct intervention of the King's Buildings.
Called the “Carrière du Roy” during the reign of Louis XIV, the latter used it a lot, especially for the Palace of Versailles, that of Saint-Cloud and many other royal constructions. The Rouge du Languedoc is thus used for the construction of the Petit Trianon in Versailles by Ange-Jacques Gabriel.

Antiquités Franck Baptiste

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Console Table Louis XIV