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Portrait of a lady of quality, early 18th century
Portrait of a lady of quality, early 18th century - Paintings & Drawings Style French Regence Portrait of a lady of quality, early 18th century - Portrait of a lady of quality, early 18th century - French Regence
Ref : 83008
7 800 €
Period :
18th century
Provenance :
France
Medium :
Oil on canvas
Dimensions :
L. 35.43 inch X l. 28.74 inch
Paintings & Drawings  - Portrait of a lady of quality, early 18th century 18th century - Portrait of a lady of quality, early 18th century French Regence - Portrait of a lady of quality, early 18th century
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Portrait of a lady of quality, early 18th century

Jean-Baptiste Oudry (1686-1755) attributed-Portrait of a lady of quality, early 18th century.

Canvas 71 cm by 59 cm.
Very beautiful old frame of 90 cm by 73 cm.

Formerly given to Nicolas de Largillière (inscription on the back of the photo-canvas), the painting is rather to be attributed to Jean-Baptiste Oudry.

Jean-Baptiste Oudry (1686-1755)

Oudry is the son of the painter Jacques Oudry, who was director of the Academy of Saint-Luc in 1706 and who ran the Quai de la Ferraille shop. According to d'Argenville, he received his first lessons from Michel Serre, cousin of Rigaud and painter of the king's galleys in Marseille. In 1707, he entered Largillière's studio, where he (first) copies Flemish and Dutch works and where he particularly studied the relationships between colors, a practice that would lead him to virtuosity, including the White Duck (1753, anc . de Cholmondeley, London) provides a famous example. He was received in 1708 at the Academy of Saint-Luc with a Saint Jerome (lost) and painted between 1709 and 1715 several religious paintings (Saint Peter delivered from prison, 1713, Schwerin museum). He also does portraits.

A disciple of Largillière, he was deeply marked by the lessons of this teaching.
His portraits are, in fact, very similar to those of Largillière, with the same gleam in the fabrics. But above all the art he had learned in this way of rendering exactly the grain and, so to speak, the flavor of each object. (the Count and Countess of Castelblanco 1716, Prado; Portrait of a hunter, Champaign, University of Illinois, Krannert Art Museum) ... He exudes in other genres, notably still lifes and hunting scenes, in to such an extent that he is quickly considered as the emulator of Desportes, whose brilliant compositions he takes up, grouping animals, flowers, musical instruments

Presented to the young Louis XV, he was appointed ordinary painter of the royal venery and he obtained accommodation in the Louvre. In 1726, he had the privilege of exhibiting 26 of his best works in the Grands Appartements of Versailles. Thanks to the protection of the intendant Fagon, he was also appointed official painter of the Beauvais tapestries factory, of which he assumed the artistic direction from 1734. Excellent administrator, he reorganized the factory, which thanks to him experienced a brilliant renewal. In 1736, he also became an inspector at the Gobelins.
The favor of amateurs like the Marquis de Beringhen and Count Tessin earned him many private commissions.

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CATALOGUE

18th Century Oil Painting French Regence