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19th Century, Pair of French Gilt Bronze Candlesticks with Porcelain
19th Century, Pair of French Gilt Bronze Candlesticks with Porcelain - Lighting Style 19th Century, Pair of French Gilt Bronze Candlesticks with Porcelain - 19th Century, Pair of French Gilt Bronze Candlesticks with Porcelain - Antiquités - 19th Century, Pair of French Gilt Bronze Candlesticks with Porcelain
Ref : 82043
18 500 €
Period :
19th century
Provenance :
France
Medium :
Bronze
Dimensions :
l. 15.35 inch X H. 22.05 inch X P. 11.02 inch
Lighting  - 19th Century, Pair of French Gilt Bronze Candlesticks with Porcelain 19th century - 19th Century, Pair of French Gilt Bronze Candlesticks with Porcelain  - 19th Century, Pair of French Gilt Bronze Candlesticks with Porcelain Antiquités - 19th Century, Pair of French Gilt Bronze Candlesticks with Porcelain
Brozzetti Antichità

European antiques


+ 39 348 4935001
19th Century, Pair of French Gilt Bronze Candlesticks with Porcelain

19th Century, Pair of French Gilt Bronze Candlesticks with Polychrome Meissen Porcelain, marble base

The pair of elegant three-light candelabra was made in France in the 19th century, in finely chiselled and gilded bronze. Stylistically they are attributable to the French bronzer Théodore Millet (1853-1904) who often liked to include in his bronze works antique porcelain elements.

This could be the case, as the candelabra have two porcelain figures by Meissen (Germany) finely painted in polychrome and depicting two characters, one male and one female in eighteenth-century clothing that support a container.

The bronze structure and the porcelain figures rest on square section bases, with rounded back, made of marble and decorated with gilt bronze applications.

The three arms, which culminate in the candle holders are chiselled with phytomorphic motifs of Rocaille taste.

These two candlesticks, distinctly ornamental, are easily inserted on consoles, dressers or tables, both of ancient and modern times. They are particularly suitable to be placed on the corner thanks to the movement of the arms. They will bring great decoration and liveliness to your environments thanks to the richness of gold and decorations, the bright color that distinguishes the precious porcelain.

The manufactory of Meissen is one of the most prestigious manufacturers of European porcelain. It dictated style trends and represented a point of reference to which many other manufactures looked, in the subjects and in the style. Meissen porcelain, hard porcelain similar to Chinese porcelain, was first produced in Dresden in 1707 by Baron Ehrenfried Walther von Tschirnhaus (1651-1708), and his assistant alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger. The "Real Porcelain Factory" was established in 1710, inside the castle of Albrechtsburg owned by the ruler of Meissen, and in 1861, it was moved to Triebisch, in the valley of Meissen, where the official headquarters of the factory is still today. Hard porcelain lent itself well to small-format sculptures and also from a pictorial point of view the contrast between the white paste, the brilliant painting and the variegated chromaticism represented a peculiarity for the taste of the time. The models for the figures were inspired by the French painters Boucher, Chardin and Watteau: groups of commoners, theatrical scenes, dancers, dancers, knights, ladies in crinoline and hunters populate the various porcelain.

Brozzetti Antichità

CATALOGUE

Chandelier