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Mystic Marriage of St. Catherine - Attributed To Giovanni Battista Tinti (1558 - 1604)
Mystic Marriage of St. Catherine - Attributed To Giovanni Battista Tinti (1558 - 1604) - Paintings & Drawings Style Mystic Marriage of St. Catherine - Attributed To Giovanni Battista Tinti (1558 - 1604) - Mystic Marriage of St. Catherine - Attributed To Giovanni Battista Tinti (1558 - 1604) -
Ref : 77761
6 500 €
Period :
<= 16th century
Provenance :
Italy
Medium :
Oil on canvas
Paintings & Drawings  - Mystic Marriage of St. Catherine - Attributed To Giovanni Battista Tinti (1558 - 1604) <= 16th century - Mystic Marriage of St. Catherine - Attributed To Giovanni Battista Tinti (1558 - 1604)  - Mystic Marriage of St. Catherine - Attributed To Giovanni Battista Tinti (1558 - 1604)
Mystic Marriage of St. Catherine - Attributed To Giovanni Battista Tinti (1558 - 1604)

Attributed to Giovanni Battista Tinti (Parma 1558 - 1604) Mystic Marriage of St. Catherine around 1590 The child, sitting on the lap of the Virgin, presents the covenant to St. Catherine of Alexandria, while the angel, further back , illustrates for the young woman the meaning of this miraculous vision. Further back, leaning against a windowsill, Saint Joseph reads a book. The description in the distance of the cupola of the cathedral of Parma, whose profile closes the horizon to the left of the figure of St. Joseph, brings this interesting painting to the environment of Parma. The model is of course the famous Correggio table, already mentioned in the Vitedi Vasari by the doctor Francesco Grinzelloni in Modena and kept in Paris at the Louvre Museum. The painting, also known through many engravings, gave rise, mainly to Emilia, to an important series of copies and replicas, in which characters of different saints were often added or the setting behind the main group was changed. Here, the poses of the characters are varied and the city of Parma appears precisely through the opportunity of the open window. The painting, which probably dates back to around 1590, can easily be compared to the well-known works of the Parma painter, Giovanni Battista Tinti, which are almost all preserved in the National Gallery or in the churches of the city. He looks to the tradition of Correggio and Parmigianino through the filter of his Bolognese masters: Orazio Sammachini (referring to the profiles of Caterina and dell'angelo) and Pellegrino Tibaldi. On the other hand, the use of a rather melted and cowardly pictorial way opens with the Venetian suggestions, which will animate Emilian painting, even more precisely, at the beginning of the 17th century. Dr. Federico Giannini Art Historian Expert in ancient painting

Excellences Fine Art

CATALOGUE

16th century Oil Painting