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 Virgin in Walnut - Köln(?), End of the fourteenth century
 Virgin in Walnut - Köln(?), End of the fourteenth century - Sculpture Style Middle age  Virgin in Walnut - Köln(?), End of the fourteenth century -  Virgin in Walnut - Köln(?), End of the fourteenth century - Middle age
Ref : 77340
14 000 €
Period :
<= 16th century
Provenance :
Germany
Medium :
Walnut wood
Dimensions :
l. 9.25 inch X H. 15.75 inch
Sculpture  -  Virgin in Walnut - Köln(?), End of the fourteenth century <= 16th century -  Virgin in Walnut - Köln(?), End of the fourteenth century
Galerie Sismann

European old masters sculpture


+33 (0)1 42 97 47 71
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Virgin in Walnut - Köln(?), End of the fourteenth century

This carved virgin appears crowned, sitting on a throne, face legs, the bust slightly turned to the left. She is dressed in a loose coat held on her breast with a goldsmith pin, decorated in its center with a quatrefoil.
The stylistic characteristics of this work invited us to fall it within the artistic context of the 14th century lotharingian sculpture, which was then, in its richness and expansion force, a real "Ecole" going from Lorraine to Cologne.
Thus, our work has a face very similar to that of the "Madonna with the burning bush" bought by the Museum of la Cour d'Or of Metz in 2018, dated from the 14th century. We find the same expressive force, the same piercing eyes, very drawn, as well as similar lips sketching a sulky pout. Nevertheless, it is in a masterpiece of the late thirteenth century from Cologne that we find the strong nose of our Virgin, as well as similar hair with carefully notched curls (Virgin and Child seated, painted wood, v. 1270, Cologne, Schnütgen-Museum).
The analysis of the drapery of Marie's coat has brought this rapprochement with Cologne closer: the too sober Lorraine drapery contrast with the one of our Virgin, very lively and animated with broken pleats of rhenish accents.
As for the reading of the subject, two assumptions can be made. The first, Mary seated on her throne was presenting the child Jesus, according to a model observed on the Cologne's art market in 2014. Second hypothesis, reinforced by multiples examples, our Virgin took place in a more important composition staging her coronation. Hes hands were joined, in prayer, while her son (or God) was placing a crown on her head.

Galerie Sismann

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Sculpture