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GERICAULT Théodore (1791-1824) -The resurrection of Christ around 1812-1814
GERICAULT Théodore (1791-1824) -The resurrection of Christ around 1812-1814 - Paintings & Drawings Style Empire GERICAULT Théodore (1791-1824) -The resurrection of Christ around 1812-1814 - GERICAULT Théodore (1791-1824) -The resurrection of Christ around 1812-1814 - Empire Antiquités - GERICAULT Théodore (1791-1824) -The resurrection of Christ around 1812-1814
Ref : 72879
125 000 €
Period :
19th century
Artist :
GERICAULT Théodore (1791-1824)
Provenance :
Private collection
Medium :
Oil on canvas
Dimensions :
L. 34.65 inch X l. 30.31 inch
Paintings & Drawings  - GERICAULT Théodore (1791-1824) -The resurrection of Christ around 1812-1814 19th century - GERICAULT Théodore (1791-1824) -The resurrection of Christ around 1812-1814 Empire - GERICAULT Théodore (1791-1824) -The resurrection of Christ around 1812-1814 Antiquités - GERICAULT Théodore (1791-1824) -The resurrection of Christ around 1812-1814
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Ancient paintings


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GERICAULT Théodore (1791-1824) -The resurrection of Christ around 1812-1814

Canvas 53.5 cm by 65 cm
Frame stamped 87.5 cm by 77 cm

We present you an authentic painting by Théodore Géricault
Bruno Chenique's 47-page expert report is available upon request. The work is visible on Paris by appointment.

The painting will be included in the catalog raisonné of Théodore Géricault's paintings, in preparation.

GERICAULT Théodore (1791-1824)

Considered as the first of the romantics, Théodore Géricault was also one of the precursors of realism. Diverse and experimental, his work bears witness to the world that disappeared with the Ancien Régime and his successor, from the Empire to the Restoration.
The son of a family, Théodore Géricault follows his parents in Paris and studies at Lycée Louis-le-Grand. His taste for painting, he entered in 1808 in the studio of Carle Vernet, where he is linked with his son Horace, then frequented that of Baron Guerin (1810-1812), who introduced him to the technique of Louis David. At the same time, he sets up his easel in the Louvre and works to make copies of great masters - especially Rubens and the painters of the Italian Renaissance. In 1811 he escaped conscription and in 1814 he became engaged in the service of Louis XVIII.
Very early, Géricault devotes a passion to the horse. Between his Officer of Hunters on Horseback of the Imperial Guard charging (Louvre), monumental format table that disturbs the visitors of the Salon of 1812, and its antithesis, the wounded Cuirassier, leaving the fire (Louvre, 1814 [other version at the Brooklyn Museum of New York]), the first painting described as "romantic", take place other portraits of soldiers who announce Gustave Courbet (Officer of Carabineers, Rouen) or who sacrifice to an inclination for the morbid (the cart of wounded soldiers, Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, Géricault made "his" trip from Italy in 1816-1817.In Florence, then in Rome, he admits his admiration for Michelangelo and Raphael, of which there are drawings that reflect his personal assimilation of classicism. , erotic scenes without restraint and the various sketches of the Race of free horses, preparatory to a great composition that will not see the day.
On his return to France, Géricault locks himself into the studio he has occupied since 1813 to focus on what remains his most ambitious work - and one of the largest pages of modern painting - the Raft of the Medusa (1818-1819, Louvre). He also finds in the murder of the notable Antoine Fualdès (1817) matter to be fixed on the fact of actuality. At the same time, he extends his interest in animal painting to other subjects than horses (bulls, cats, dogs, animals from the Jardin des Plantes, and even animals at the slaughterhouse), while becoming a portraitist of children. . Above all, he is one of the first in France, with Baron Gros, to practice lithography (the Boxing Combat being indicative of the strong interest of the artist for the fate of blacks).
In 1820-1821, Géricault stayed in London, where his Raft of the Medusa was successfully exhibited. He becomes aware of the objectivity of painters as Constable in front of nature. His lithographs will also mark the birth of the modern landscape. In addition to the Epsom Derby (1821, Louvre), he executed numerous studies of working or draft horses. His latest Parisian works are characterized by a saving of light (the plaster oven, 1822-1823, Louvre). Among them are the five portraits of the mentally ill (Aliéné cleptoman, circa 1822) in which Géricault demonstrates a scientific realism that is as exceptional in its bill as respectful of people.
Died at the age of 32 following a fall from his horse, Géricault had a career of twelve years, during which only three of his works were exhibited. He will nonetheless exert a decisive influence on Eugène Delacroix and on most other great painters of the nineteenth century.

Galerie PhC

CATALOGUE

19th Century Oil Painting Empire