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Portrait of Bonaparte - Piat-Joseph Sauvage circa 1800
Portrait of Bonaparte - Piat-Joseph Sauvage circa 1800 - Paintings & Drawings Style Empire Portrait of Bonaparte - Piat-Joseph Sauvage circa 1800 - Portrait of Bonaparte - Piat-Joseph Sauvage circa 1800 - Empire
Ref : 72363
Price on Request
Period :
19th century
Artist :
Piat-Joseph Sauvage
Provenance :
France
Medium :
Oil on canvas
Dimensions :
l. 27.17 inch X H. 31.5 inch
Paintings & Drawings  - Portrait of Bonaparte - Piat-Joseph Sauvage circa 1800 19th century - Portrait of Bonaparte - Piat-Joseph Sauvage circa 1800 Empire - Portrait of Bonaparte - Piat-Joseph Sauvage circa 1800
Antiquités Franck Baptiste

French Regional and Parisian furniture


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Portrait of Bonaparte - Piat-Joseph Sauvage circa 1800

Rare portrait of the first consul Bonaparte, oil on canvas, grisaille in imitation of bas-reliefs in marble.
The consul is represented in bust, face, and dressed in a jacket embroidered with palmettes.
Below the inscription "Bonaparte".

Good state of conservation, on its canvas and its original chassis.

Wooden frame and golden stucco period.

Work of Piat-Joseph Sauvage around 1800.

Dimensions:
Frame: Height: 80 cm; Width: 69 cm; Canvas: Height: 65.5 cm; Width: 55.5 cm

Similar artworks:

Collection of the Malmaison and Bois-Préau Castle Inventory number MM.77.4.3

Sale Osenat Fontainebleau from December 5th, 2010 lot 181: 12 500 euros

Piat Joseph Sauvage (1744-1818)
Piat Joseph Sauvage is a Flemish painter best known for his decorative painting, his grisailles and trompe-l'oeil in camaïeu, influenced by the work of Jacob de Wit. He specialized in imitation carved bas-reliefs in stone and marble, but also patinated bronze, terracotta and stucco.
He made grisaille and trompe-l'oeil door-tops in his hometown (works in the museum) as well as for the royal houses (the castles of Versailles, Fontainebleau and Compiègne), for provincial churches (Trois Angels, Orleans Museum). The themes he particularly likes to illustrate his bas-reliefs are: the scene in the Antique with draped characters, still lifes, allegories and bacchanals of putti playing with garlands of flowers and animals.
Sauvage works in the family business (his father, Antoine Sauvage, was a glazier) until the age of seventeen, while receiving technical training at the School of Drawing. He then perfected his artistic education at the Antwerp Academy under the direction of the painter of history and grisailles Martin-Joseph Geeraerts.
He moved to Paris in 1774 and became a member of the Académie de Saint-Luc. In 1783, he was admitted to the Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture, which allowed him to be named first painter of Louis-Joseph Bourbon, Prince of Condé and King Louis XVI. In this capacity, he paints portraits and medallions of the royal family of France and portraits of famous men.
During the reign of Napoleon, he received a large number of orders, some of which were for portraits of the Emperor in grisaille; He realizes the ceiling of the chapel of the castle of Saint-Cloud and decorates the theater of Chantilly (razed under the Revolution). From 1804 to 1807, he worked as a painter of porcelain figures at the famous Manufacture de Sèvres.
He is represented in various French museums, notably in Bordeaux (Tribute to Pan) as well as in the Metropolitan Museum (Venus and Cupidon, the Triumph of Bacchus) and in the Louvre (Frize of young children).

Antiquités Franck Baptiste

CATALOGUE

19th Century Oil Painting Empire