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Oak panel with the parabel of the Prodigal Son, early 16th C.
Oak panel with the parabel of the Prodigal Son, early 16th C. - Sculpture Style Renaissance Oak panel with the parabel of the Prodigal Son, early 16th C. - Oak panel with the parabel of the Prodigal Son, early 16th C. - Renaissance Antiquités - Oak panel with the parabel of the Prodigal Son, early 16th C.
Ref : 72141
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Period :
16th century
Sculpture  - Oak panel with the parabel of the Prodigal Son, early 16th C. 16th century - Oak panel with the parabel of the Prodigal Son, early 16th C. Renaissance - Oak panel with the parabel of the Prodigal Son, early 16th C. Antiquités - Oak panel with the parabel of the Prodigal Son, early 16th C.
Kim J. Nazzi

Sculptures & Works of Art


+32 476 266 122
Oak panel with the parabel of the Prodigal Son, early 16th C.

A carved oakwood panel depicting a passage of the parable of the Prodigal Son, as told in the gospel of Luke. He is depicted kneeling, holding a bowl of food above a pig trough with two pigs awaiting their supper. The biblical scene is flanked by a coat of arms and a grotesque head with bulging eyes which stretches his own mouth with both hands, a so-called "mouth-puller", as if it was mocking the scene.

This panel was once part of a wainscoting with two mortise and tenon joints still visible. Most likely, it was mounted as a decorative frieze, placed close to the ceiling, with a series of different scenes that would have narrated the entire parable of the Prodigal Son, which goes as follows :

“Not long after that, the younger son got together all he had, set off for a distant country and there squandered his wealth in wild living. After he had spent everything, there was a severe famine in that whole country, and he began to be in need. So he went and hired himself out to a citizen of that country, who sent him to his fields to feed pigs. He longed to fill his stomach with the pods that the pigs were eating, but no one gave him anything.”

Anglo-Flemish. Early 16th century.

Dimensions: 31cm x 27cm x thickness 5cm

An old collector's label on the back. The top rail has been added to allow the panel to be suspended. Judging from the wrought iron nails this was already done during 18th or early 19th century, probably when the building it was once part of was demolished.

Panels of this quality with such a representation are extremely rare and are seldom offered for sale.

Kim J. Nazzi

CATALOGUE

Wood Sculpture Renaissance