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Danae receiving Jupiter in the guise of a shower of gold, with a curtain
Danae receiving Jupiter in the guise of a shower of gold, with a curtain - Paintings & Drawings Style Danae receiving Jupiter in the guise of a shower of gold, with a curtain - Danae receiving Jupiter in the guise of a shower of gold, with a curtain - Antiquités - Danae receiving Jupiter in the guise of a shower of gold, with a curtain
Ref : 72030
18 000 €
Period :
17th century
Provenance :
Netherlands
Medium :
Oil on panel
Dimensions :
L. 16.14 inch X l. 11.81 inch
Paintings & Drawings  - Danae receiving Jupiter in the guise of a shower of gold, with a curtain 17th century - Danae receiving Jupiter in the guise of a shower of gold, with a curtain  - Danae receiving Jupiter in the guise of a shower of gold, with a curtain
Jean Moust

17th century Flemish and Dutch paintings


+32 475 743 753
+32 50 34 44 35
Danae receiving Jupiter in the guise of a shower of gold, with a curtain

Attributed to Daniel Thivart
Dutch painter
Amsterdam (?) 1611 – before 1657 Amsterdam (?)
Danae receiving Jupiter in the guise of a shower of gold, with a curtain
Oil on panel : 30,3 X 41,2 cm
Unsigned
Frame : 42,1 X 53,4 cm

Exhibited: Düsseldorf, Museum Kunstpalast, “Hinter them Vorhang” (“Behind the Curtain”), 1/10/16 – 22/01/17 as Attributed to Jacob
van Loo.
Published: in the catalogue of the exhibition, under the redaction of Claudia Blümle and Beat Wismer, 2016, P. 83 with a full page colour photograph, as Attributed to Jacob van Loo.

Our painting is known at the RKD, The Hague, number 0000199214.
Dr. Fred Meijer from the RKD has proposed an attribution to Thivart.

The story of Danae is an ancient Greek myth: a prophecy had told the king of Argos that if ever his daughter Princess Danae would be pregnant, she would give birth to a son that would kill him. The king had her therefore locked up in a bronze chamber, but this could not prevent Zeus to “visit” her in the form of a golden rain, and nine months later Perseus was born.

The first century AD Roman author Pliny the Elder told of a contest between Greece’s most famous painters: the winner had painted a curtain, which the other contestant wanted to pull aside. Painting “fake” curtains that seem to hang “outside” of the painting became the ultimate test for painters. Our painter has even gone further and painted two curtains: one inside the mythological scenery and a second one outside of it.

Jean Moust

CATALOGUE

17th Century Oil Painting