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Dutch school of the 17th century circa 1620, Frederic V of Bohemia
Dutch school of the 17th century circa 1620, Frederic V of Bohemia - Paintings & Drawings Style Louis XIII Dutch school of the 17th century circa 1620, Frederic V of Bohemia - Dutch school of the 17th century circa 1620, Frederic V of Bohemia - Louis XIII Antiquités - Dutch school of the 17th century circa 1620, Frederic V of Bohemia
Ref : 62965
4 800 €
Period :
17th century
Provenance :
Private collection
Medium :
Oil on canvas
Dimensions :
L. 26.38 inch X l. 22.83 inch
Paintings & Drawings  - Dutch school of the 17th century circa 1620, Frederic V of Bohemia 17th century - Dutch school of the 17th century circa 1620, Frederic V of Bohemia Louis XIII - Dutch school of the 17th century circa 1620, Frederic V of Bohemia Antiquités - Dutch school of the 17th century circa 1620, Frederic V of Bohemia
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Dutch school of the 17th century circa 1620, Frederic V of Bohemia

Dutch school of the seventeenth century circa 1620, circle of Jan Anthonisz VAN RAVESTEYN

Portrait of Prince Frederic Comes of Palatinate (Frederic V of Bohemia).

Canvas of 53 cm by 42 cm
Beautiful finely worked frame of 67 cm by 58 cm
Rentoilage and old restorations.

Prince Frédéric Comes of the Palatinate (1597-1632)

Frédéric V, born in 1597, is the son of Prince Elector, Count Palatine of the Rhine Frederick IV (house of Wittelsbach, branch of the Palatinate-Simmern) and Louise-Juliana of Orange-Nassau, daughter of William I and Charlotte Of Bourbon.
He succeeded his father as Lector of the Palatinate in 1610. In 1613, he married Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of James VI King of England and Ireland. From this marriage 13 children are born.
Frederick took the lead of the Protestant Union of Germany and in 1619 he accepted the Crown of Bohemia. The following year, he was defeated by the forces of the Catholic coalition.
The victorious forces invaded the Palatinate and Frederick took refuge in Holland, where he lived in the shadows. He died at Mainz in 1632.
Thanks to his marriage in the royal house of Stuart, Frederick was known to the English people and admired for his commitment to the cause of Protestantism. King James VI was also reproached for not having sufficiently assisted his son-in-law.
Throughout the religious struggles of the 17th century, he remained the great defender of his faith, the champion of militant Calvinism.

Jan Anthonisz VAN RAVESTEYN (1570 approx. -1657)

Specialized in portraiture and stylistically very close to Mierevelt, Ravesteyn is one of the first and most active representatives of the realistic portrait of the Dutch school of the seventeenth century.
 The son of a painter on glass, he probably trained at Delft at Mierevelt, who was already living in this town in 1597, and who greatly influenced him in an austere and scrupulous manner of treating the portrait in the face of the mannerist audacities of Haarlem and Utrecht.
He participated in the development of a measured realism which triumphed in the seventeenth century.
Ravesteyn had to establish himself fairly quickly at Delft, for he appeared in 1598 on the registers of the gilde of Saint-Luc of that city. In 1640 he married his daughter to a well-known flamboyant portraitist, Andries Hanneman, while his brother Anthony and his nephew Arnold were also portraits painters.
Ravesteyn had several pupils whose works had scarcely left any trace. At the end of his life, around 1654-1656, he took part in the founding of the new brotherhood of the painters of The Hague. His work is very vast, though fairly uniform: careful portraits painted in a severe and traditional harmony of blacks, whites and grays, but sometimes with framing, a Flemish sense of volume (which he has in common with Frans Hals That his portrait of the family of Brunswick makes one think of a Cornelis de Vos) and a force of attention that best distinguish him from Mierevelt, as shown by the Couple de Lille (1620), the pendants powerfully housed in an architectural motif , Or the excellent Pieter van Veen and his son of the Museum of Geneva who can compete with the best Keyser. Confusion is possible with other portraitists no less exact and worthy traditional, such as Cornelis van der Voort and Nicolas Elias Pickenoy.
We should not forget the important collective portraits of Ravesteyn which bear comparison with those of Hals by the force of presence of the models and the quality of the attitudes happily diversified, as the officers of the civic guard received by the council of the (1618), an important canvas preserved in the Hague Municipal Museum.

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CATALOGUE

17th Century Oil Painting Louis XIII