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Japan, 19th c black lacquer horse doll, Kazari-uma ningyo.
Japan, 19th c black lacquer horse doll, Kazari-uma ningyo. - Asian Art & Antiques Style Japan, 19th c black lacquer horse doll, Kazari-uma ningyo. - Japan, 19th c black lacquer horse doll, Kazari-uma ningyo. - Antiquités - Japan, 19th c black lacquer horse doll, Kazari-uma ningyo.
Ref : 62166
Price on Request
Period :
19th century
Provenance :
Japan
Medium :
Lacquer on wood
Dimensions :
L. 19.69 inch X l. 6.3 inch X H. 12.6 inch
Asian Art & Antiques  - Japan, 19th c black lacquer horse doll, Kazari-uma ningyo. 19th century - Japan, 19th c black lacquer horse doll, Kazari-uma ningyo.  - Japan, 19th c black lacquer horse doll, Kazari-uma ningyo. Antiquités - Japan, 19th c black lacquer horse doll, Kazari-uma ningyo.
Cristina Ortega & Michel Dermigny

Asian Art


+33 (0)1 42 61 09 57
+33 (0)6 07 48 10 28
Japan, 19th c black lacquer horse doll, Kazari-uma ningyo.

Japan, 19th c black lacquer horse doll, Kazari-uma ningyo.
Kazari-uma ningyo are a kind of musha ningyo, or Boy's Day doll.
As Sparky C. of SPA-KUN wrote in "The Horse of the Rising Sun":
"In a tradition dating back to the 16th century, the Kazari-uma is part of the array of warrior dolls and tot-sized battle gear displayed in the homes of Japanese boys every May 5 (which until 1948 was called Tango no Sekku, or Boy’s Day; it’s now the holiday Kodomo no Hi, or Children’s Day).

This Horse is made of lacquer on wood (later Kazari-uma are often white and made of touso (a wood-based composition material) or paper mache, covered with either keuesaiku pasted-on silk-fiber hairs).
Eyes are made of crystal and mane and tail are made of a rooted horse hair. It has been tacked with lacquered wood, card and ribbons reproducing allthe ties and nots of the equipment of the horse.
Horses were brought to Japan in the early 5th century. Records indicate that during the reign of Emperor Yuryaku (457-478), equestrian events were sponsored during the 5th month in conjunction with other spring rites to encourage mastery in this area. Called yabusame, the event consisted of shooting arrows from horseback at stationary targets.
The horse fundamentally changed the nature of Japanese combat, and images of the ideal warrior soon centered on the horse. The finest animals came to be raised in Kanto and warriors from this area were renowned for their skill and bravery. Kyuba no michi (Way of the Horse and Bow) was one of the earliest martial codes of behavior which later became the Bushi-do or "Way of the Warrior". Tango no Sekku celebrated this connection: horse and ridder, courage and bravery.
32 x 50x 16 cm
Japan, Late Edo/ Meiji Period.

Delevery information :

A special care is given to packing. Bigest pieces are crated.
All our shippings are insured with tracking.
As we do a lot of shippings, we do have very special rates. Please inquire!

Cristina Ortega & Michel Dermigny

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Asian Art & Antiques