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Flemish School of the seventeenth century, Abraham van Diepenbeeck worksho
Flemish School of the seventeenth century, Abraham van Diepenbeeck worksho - Paintings & Drawings Style Louis XIII Flemish School of the seventeenth century, Abraham van Diepenbeeck worksho - Flemish School of the seventeenth century, Abraham van Diepenbeeck worksho - Louis XIII Antiquités - Flemish School of the seventeenth century, Abraham van Diepenbeeck worksho
Ref : 54343
SOLD
Period :
17th century
Provenance :
Private collection
Medium :
Oil on canvas
Dimensions :
L. 39.37 inch X l. 23.62 inch
Paintings & Drawings  - Flemish School of the seventeenth century, Abraham van Diepenbeeck worksho 17th century - Flemish School of the seventeenth century, Abraham van Diepenbeeck worksho Louis XIII - Flemish School of the seventeenth century, Abraham van Diepenbeeck worksho Antiquités - Flemish School of the seventeenth century, Abraham van Diepenbeeck worksho
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Ancient paintings


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Flemish School of the seventeenth century, Abraham van Diepenbeeck worksho

The Fall of Phaeton - Abraham van Diepenbeeck workshop (1596 -1675) Flemish School of the seventeenth century,

Oil on canvas (100 cm by 60 cm)

Our table, probably a studio work, resumes with some variations the Phaeton drop Diepenbeeck.

The mythological story:
Phaeton or Phaethon , was a demigod, also called "Brilliant"; he was a son of Helios and Clymene Océanide or Merope (other traditions make the son of Cephalus and Eos).
After finding her son, who was raised by his single mother, Helios had rashly promised to grant him what he wanted. Phaethon chose to drive the chariot of the sun.
Helios tried to explain to him that no mortal could drive his chariot safe, but Phaeton demanded that his father keep his promise.
Quickly, Phaethon realized that his father had been right. Terrified by the altitude and the animals of the zodiac signs, he quickly lost control of the horses, and he approached the ground too, where he nearly set on fire and then he rose again and then disrupted the race the stars.
To save the universe, Zeus was forced to overwhelm the young unconscious driver and threw him into the river Eridanus (the Po).
The Héliades, sisters, wept so that the tears solidified drops of amber and they themselves were turned into poplars.

Abraham van Diepenbeeck,
Flemish painter, baptized May 9, 1596 at 's-Hertogenbosch, died December 31, 1675 in Antwerp.

Young, Abraham van Diepenbeeck learns the stained glass technique with his father, Jan van Roelofszone Diepenbeeck. It follows classical studies and moved to Antwerp between 1621 and 1623. There he made several windows, including the Saint-Jacques Cathedral (works of the mercy) and the Dominican church (St. Paul Life). He became a student of Rubens in 1623. In 1626-1627, he participated in the execution of boxes in the series of tapestries The glorification of the Eucharist, commissioned by the Infanta Isabella in Rubens' studio.
In 1636, Van Diepenbeek acquires citizenship of Antwerp. He was admitted to the Guild of St. Luke in 1638 and became director of the academy in 1641.
After a trip to Italy, he began to draw illustrations. Among them, there are 59 drawings engraved by Cornelis Bloemaert to illustrate the Tables of the Temple of the Muses of Marolles Abbot. He also traveled to England during the reign of Charles I of England, where he painted portraits of the Duke of Newcastle and his family and shows a riding Treaty.

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CATALOGUE

17th Century Oil Painting Louis XIII