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MONUMENTAL COAT OF ARMS ON STATUARY MARBLE
MONUMENTAL COAT OF ARMS ON STATUARY MARBLE - Architectural & Garden Style Louis XIV MONUMENTAL COAT OF ARMS ON STATUARY MARBLE - MONUMENTAL COAT OF ARMS ON STATUARY MARBLE - Louis XIV
Ref : 113186
65 000 €
Period :
17th century
Provenance :
Italy
Medium :
Marble
Dimensions :
l. 49.21 inch X H. 62.99 inch
Architectural & Garden  - MONUMENTAL COAT OF ARMS ON STATUARY MARBLE 17th century - MONUMENTAL COAT OF ARMS ON STATUARY MARBLE
Allemandi Fine Art

Painting sculpture art objects


: +39 335387686
MONUMENTAL COAT OF ARMS ON STATUARY MARBLE

Monumental coat of arms in statuary marble depicting the heraldry of the Tocco family.
Height 160 cm width 125 cm.
17th century
The great and historic Tocco noble family linked its fortunes and glory to the Municipality of Montemiletto for over four centuries, from 1383 to 1806. According to some authors, this powerful House has Gothic origins, and exactly descends from the heroic King of the Goths, Baduila, nicknamed Totila, the immortal, according to others it is of Lombard origin. Certainly its roots are very ancient and very noble, because over the centuries its members have taken an active and valiant part in the most important events that have characterized the history of Southern Italy, in particular the city of Capua, Sicily, the Terra Beneventana, the city of Tropea, the Terra di Lavoro, the Province of the Principality of Ulterior. Ancient writers report that the places of origin of the House are above all Benevento - and therefore the Barony of Tocco, from which it takes its surname - and the city of Capua, for which many are called "capuani"; the Family was divided into two large branches, distinguished in "Tocco delle Bande." having for Arms three bands of vermilion alternating with the same number of gold, with a rampant and emerging lion for the crest) and "Touch of the Waves" (having for Arms three or four blue waves with the same number of silver and the Pegasus for the crest); unique was the motto "Si qua fata sinant"' (*until the fates allow it"), which is a verse from the 1st book of the Aeneid by P. Virgilio Ma-
tone.
hic illius weapon,
hic currus fuit; hoc regnum goddess gentibus esse,
¿here fairy sinant, iam tam tenditque foverque":
here were the weapons, here was her chariot and since then the goddess has been contending and this is expected to be the empire of the people, as long as the fates allow it".
The most glorious and illustrious branch was that of the "waves".

Allemandi Fine Art

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