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Louis XIV as a Roman emperor - French school of the 18th century According to Pierre Mignard
Louis XIV as a Roman emperor - French school of the 18th century According to Pierre Mignard - Paintings & Drawings Style Louis XIV Louis XIV as a Roman emperor - French school of the 18th century According to Pierre Mignard -
Ref : 100882
4 800 €
Period :
18th century
Provenance :
France
Medium :
Oil on canvas
Dimensions :
L. 21.26 inch X l. 17.72 inch
Paintings & Drawings  - Louis XIV as a Roman emperor - French school of the 18th century According to Pierre Mignard 18th century - Louis XIV as a Roman emperor - French school of the 18th century According to Pierre Mignard
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Ancient paintings


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Louis XIV as a Roman emperor - French school of the 18th century According to Pierre Mignard

According to Pierre Mignard, Louis XIV as a Roman emperor. French school of the 18th century

Original canvas of 42 cm by 33 cm
Period frame of 54 cm by 45 cm

This beautiful little painting partially reproduces a work by Pierre Mignard that can be admired in Versailles. The canvas bears a signature not yet deciphered on the back. Very nice period frame. The canvas and the frame are also original.

Pierre Mignard (1612-1695)

After an apprenticeship with Jean Boucher in Bourges, he studied the great decorations of Fontainebleau, like his brother Nicolas. Protected by Marshal de Vitry, he entered the studio of Simon Vouet in Paris, where he befriended the painter and writer Dufresnoy; he finds this one in Italy, where he goes in 1635 and where he will spend more than twenty years. Back in France in 1657, he aroused admiration for his portraits of women, often flattering (Duchess of Portsmouth, 1682, London, NPG), for various ceilings, all missing, for Parisian hotels and for his large fresco composition in the dome of the church of Val-de-Grâce (1663). The color is a little gray (as a result, the sources tell us, of the use of badly slaked lime in the mortar), but the clear and rigorous order of this sky populated by some 200 figures, the only large cupola painted in the 17th century. which remains in France, remains striking. Mignard then posed as a rival of Le Brun and took the head of the Academy of Saint-Luc, in battle with the Royal Academy. Long excluded from the royal works, he was finally able to execute large decorations, first for the Duke of Orléans at Saint-Cloud (1677-1680, destroyed but partly engraved by J.-B. de Poilly; this set was completed by a Pietà, painted for the chapel of the castle in 1682, today in the Sainte-Marie-Madeleine church in Gennevilliers), for the Grand Condé (Andromeda, 1679, Louvre), then for Monseigneur at Versailles (1683-84 ), finally for Louis XIV himself: in 1685, he painted the ceilings of the Petite Galerie (engraved by G. Audran) and the salons that accompany it. All these ceilings are unfortunately destroyed; however, they formed the part that the painter himself considered the most important of his work. Supported by Louvois, Mignard gradually supplants Le Brun, with whom he leads an open struggle. Mignard, almost octogenarian, succeeds him in his offices and dignities and displays an incredible activity. He multiplies the projects for the decoration of the church of the Invalides (drawings in the Louvre), undertakes ceilings for the small apartment of the king in Versailles (fragments in the museums of Grenoble, Lille, Toulouse, Dinan, at the castle of Fontainebleau ) and painted a series of religious paintings in rare and subtle colours. He died while putting the finishing touches to his Self-Portrait in Saint Luke (Troyes Museum). Paradoxically, most of his works that have escaped oblivion (including almost all of the approximately 300 drawings held by the Louvre) date from the last years of his long life.

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CATALOGUE

18th Century Oil Painting Louis XIV